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Help Kids Falling Short on Nutrients They Need this School Year

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To Your Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Milk is one of the most requested, but least donated items at food banks, meaning children in need may be missing out on essential nutrients

(Family Features) The school year should be filled with playing, learning and growing, but for many children who face hunger, even basic staples like milk are missing. According to experts, one out of two kids ages 9 and up fall short on calcium, vitamin D and potassium – essential nutrients they need to grow strong. Milk is the top food source for these nutrients, and the likelihood of kids missing out is even greater when they don’t have access to fresh, nutritious foods like milk.

More than 46 million Americans – including 12 million children – are served by Feeding America® food banks each year. From the kitchen to the classroom, kids in your own community may be missing out on essential nutrients they need to be set up for success this fall.

Here are a few ways you can help kids facing hunger:

  • Give highly desired, nutrient-rich milk. Milk’s nutrition helps get kids ready to learn. Yet, on average, people served by Feeding America food banks receive the equivalent of less than one gallon of milk per person per year. To help fill this need, The Great American Milk Drive and Feeding America – alongside America’s dairy farmers and milk companies – make it easy for people to donate milk directly in their communities. With nine essential nutrients, milk is an easy and affordable way to help ensure kids facing hunger have more access to nutrients they might otherwise be missing. By entering your zip code when you donate at milklife.com/give, you can ensure that the milk is delivered to a local Feeding America food bank in your very own community.
  • Collect food donations from friends and family. Hosting family dinners, football tailgates or Thanksgiving this year? You can benefit families in need by asking guests to bring something to donate to a food bank. While most people think of canned or dry goods, perishable foods like fresh produce and milk are harder to donate and often needed. Find your nearest food bank and check its immediate needs or any donation guidelines at FeedingAmerica.org.
  • Volunteer at your local food bank or food pantry. Gather your friends and family to fight hunger in your community by donating what many food banks may need most – your time. Spending a few hours sorting, packing or stacking food can make a big difference for the food banks and the families they serve. Visit FeedingAmerica.org and find a local Feeding America food bank near you.

Since it began in 2014, The Great American Milk Drive has delivered more than 1.8 million gallons of milk – more than 28 million servings – to food banks across the country. Learn more about milk’s nutrition and the need for milk in food banks at milklife.com/give.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

October 31, 2018 |

Exquisite Eating

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Small plates to make for appealing dishes

(Family Features) Imagine treating yourself and your dinner guests to a delicious, restaurant-caliber meal without leaving your dining room or hiring a personal chef. Small plates, also known as tapas, are lighter, bite-sized indulgences that you can prepare and style seamlessly. By putting your own artful, unique spin on small plates, you can indulge in a meal that appeals to the senses and conveys sophistication.

It can be easy to create delicious small plates: all you need are wholesome, seasonal ingredients to pair with an artisan-crafted, quality olive oil such as Carapelli. The line, with three varieties to explore, brings a renaissance to the modern kitchen and is ideal for endeavoring chefs looking to try new flavors and experiment with tastes or recipes. It embodies a true passion for the art of creating extra-virgin olive oils and is designed to lift cooks out of the everyday cooking experience.

Keep in mind that when it comes to small plates, what’s important isn’t just the recipe, but the plate – and plating – of the cuisine itself. Foods that appeal to the eye are likely to tempt the taste buds as well. Invest in appropriate-sized dishware for small plates that allows the food to take center-stage.

For a true multi-sensory indulgence, also take time to garnish your dishes, big and small, with edible enhancements that lend a subtle complement to the main attraction. A selection of fresh greens, sprinkling of herbs and even a light drizzle of olive oil can do the trick.

Plan how you’ll adapt your favorite dishes for size – and season – with more tips and recipes at carapelliusa.com.

Carrots and Fresh Herbs with Champagne-Dijon Vinaigrette

Prep time: 10 minutes

Servings: 6

Champagne-Dijon Vinaigrette:

2          tablespoons champagne vinegar

1          teaspoon Dijon Mustard

1          tablespoon clover honey

1/2       cup Carapelli Organic Olive Oil

1/2       teaspoon garlic, minced

1/2       teaspoon sea salt

1/4       teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1          teaspoon fresh parsley, finely chopped

1          teaspoon basil, finely chopped

1          pound carrots, peeled and finely shredded

2          tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped

2          tablespoons chives, thinly sliced, plus more cut into 3/4-inch pieces, for garnish

1/3       cup Champagne Vinaigrette

fine sea salt, to taste

freshly ground black pepper, to taste

chive sticks, for garnish

 

In medium mixing bowl, combine champagne vinegar, Dijon and honey. Whisk constantly until well combined. While whisking, slowly drizzle in olive oil to emulsify. Add garlic, salt, pepper, parsley and basil: whisk to combine.

In mixing bowl, toss carrots, parsley and chives. Add dressing. Season, to taste, with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Garnish with chive sticks.

Notes: Vinaigrette can be stored in refrigerator up to five days. For zestier salad, add additional 2 tablespoons vinaigrette to carrots; serve with crusty bread.

Whipped Ricotta and Goat Cheese Beet Skewers

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 3 hours, plus cooling time

Servings: 42 skewers

Beets:

2          beets (about 1 pound), 3 inches in diameter, peeled and sliced into 3/4-inch chunks

1          tablespoon Carapelli Oro Verde Extra Virgin Olive Oil, plus more for drizzling

1/2       teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

1          teaspoon sea salt

arugula, for garnish

flaked sea salt, for garnish

Whipped Ricotta and Goat Cheese:

4          ounces goat cheese

1/4       cup whole milk ricotta cheese

1          tablespoon Carapelli Oro Verde Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1/4       teaspoon lemon zest

1/8       teaspoon sea salt

1/8       teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

Heat sous vide water bath to 185 F.

In mixing bowl, combine beets, olive oil, thyme and salt; toss to coat. Remove beets from liquid and divide, placing them in single layer into two quart-sized vacuum-seal bags, leaving any excess liquid behind.

Use vacuum sealer to remove air and double-seal bag. To use zip-top bags instead, slowly dip slightly open bags into large container filled with water, allowing water to displace air. Seal bags when air is removed.

Place vacuum-sealed bag into prepared water bath, placing heavy, heat-resistant bowl on top of beets to keep them submerged, if necessary. Cook 3 hours.

If you do not have a sous vide machine, bring large stock pot filled with water to rolling boil. Place vacuum-sealed bags in water. Reduce to gentle simmer, cover and cook 1 hour.

Carefully remove beets from water bath and cool in sealed bag until they reach room temperature, about 30 minutes. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes more before serving.

In mini food processor, cream goat cheese, ricotta and olive oil until smooth. Add zest, salt and pepper: stir to combine.

Transfer cheese mixture to piping bag fitted with star tip and refrigerate until ready to use.

To serve, remove beets from bag and arrange on serving platter. Pipe dollop of Whipped Ricotta and Goat Cheese onto each beet. Drizzle with olive oil.

Garnish with arugula and pinch of flaked sea salt; place skewer through each beet to serve.

Olive Oil Drizzled Pecorino Popcorn

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 5 minutes

Servings: 4

1/2       cup grated pecorino, plus more for garnish

1/2       teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more for garnish

3          tablespoons Carapelli Unfiltered Extra Virgin Olive Oil, divided

1/3       cup yellow popcorn kernels

In bowl, combine pecorino and pepper; mix until well combined and there are no cheese clumps.

In small saucepan over low flame, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil; keep warm.

Add remaining olive oil and popcorn to large Dutch oven. Stir until all popcorn kernels are coated in oil.

Cover Dutch oven with lid and cook over medium-high heat, shaking pot periodically. Once popcorn begins to pop, lower heat to medium and continue to shake pot approximately every 15 seconds. When popping slows considerably, remove Dutch oven from heat and allow to rest until popping ceases, about 30 seconds.

Remove lid and transfer popcorn to large mixing bowl. Drizzle warm olive oil over popcorn; toss to coat. Sprinkle cheese mixture over popcorn; toss to coat.

Divide popcorn into bowls. Sprinkle some freshly grated pecorino and dash of freshly ground black pepper over top; serve.

October 31, 2018 |

More Tools: Read Smart, Read More

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ROI by Frank J. Rich

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Frank J. Rich

 

 

Effective managers are usually good readers. But maybe reading wasn’t a strong suit growing up, and despite the fact that you are doing well in your field, you always wanted to be a better reader. Your instincts are right. Better readers are more successful. It’s true, for a lot of reasons, but for one in particular — good readers have more information on which to make better judgments. It’s that simple.

But, how do you become a good reader? For years my children and others would pose the question to me. So, I began to consider the question more carefully. And while there are many “tools” that aid the goal of becoming a good reader, a few simple basics can make a big difference. Consider the strategies below, compiled over the years, among the tools that improve your odds at success … in anything you do — not least, reading.

#1 Determine what you want to know — First ask: Why am I reading this text? Is it with a purpose (in learning) or just for pleasure? What do I want to know after reading it? Once you know this, you can examine the text to see whether it is going to satisfy your goal.

An easy way of doing this is to look at the introduction and the chapter headings. The introduction should reveal the target audience and what the material seeks to achieve. Chapter headings provide an overall view of the structure of the subject.

Finally, ask whether the book meets your needs. Does it presume too much or too little knowledge (on the part of the reader)? If it doesn’t fit your need, find another.

#2 Determine how deeply to study the material
 — When you only need the shallowest knowledge of the subject, you can skim material. Read only chapter headings, introductions and summaries when this is your goal.

If you need a moderate level of information on a subject, scan the text. Here, you would read the chapter introductions and summaries in detail. You may then “speed read” the contents of chapters, selecting and understanding key words and concepts. Diagrams and graphs help at this level.

Only when you need detailed knowledge of a subject must you study the text. First skim the material to get an overview of the subject. This gives you an understanding of its structure, into which you can fit the detail gained from a full reading of the material. SQ3R is a good technique for getting a deep understanding of a text. This is the technique that follows a sequential method of examining any document, as outlined below.

Survey Survey the document: scan the contents, introduction, chapter introductions and chapter summaries to pick up a shallow overview of the text. Form an opinion of whether it will be of any help. If it does not give you the information you want, discard it.

Question — Make a note of any questions on the subject that come to mind, or particularly interest you following your survey. Even scan the document again to see if any stand out. These questions may be considered as study goals; understanding the answers can help structure the information in your own mind.

Read Now read the document. Read through useful sections in detail, taking care to understand all the points that are relevant. For some texts this reading may be very slow, especially when it contains a lot of dense and complicated information. While you are reading, it can help to take notes in “concept” or mind mapping format. (More on that next week)

Recall —
 Once you have read appropriate sections of the document, run through it in your mind several times. Isolate the core facts or the essential processes behind the subject and then see how other information fits around them.

Review — Once you have run through the exercise of recalling the information, you can move on to the stage of reviewing it. Reread the document, expand your notes, or discuss the material with colleagues. A particularly effective method of reviewing information is to teach it to someone else!

#3 Active Reading 
— When you are reading a document in detail, it often helps if you highlight, underline and annotate it as you go on. This emphasizes information in your mind, and helps you to review important points later. This also helps to keep your mind focused on the material and keeps it from wandering.

If active reading helps, you may want to photocopy information in more expensive texts, then read and mark the photocopies. If the benefit you get by active reading reasonably exceeds the value of the book, then the book is disposable, so don’t buy it.

#4 How to study different sorts of material
 — Different sorts of documents hold information in different places and in different ways. They have different depths and breadths of coverage. By understanding the layout of the material you are reading, you can extract useful information much more efficiently.

Reading Magazines and Newspapers These tend to give a very fragmented coverage of a topical area. They typically concentrate on the most interesting and glamorous parts of a topic. This helps to sell copies! They will often ignore less interesting information that may be essential to a full understanding of a subject. Typically areas of useful information are padded out with large amounts of irrelevant waffle or with advertising.

The most effective way of getting information from magazines is to scan the contents tables or indexes and turn directly to articles of interest. If you find an article useful, then cut it out and file it in a folder specifically covering that sort of information. In this way you will build up sets of related articles that may begin to explain the subject.

Newspapers tend to be arranged in sections. If you read a paper often, you can learn quickly which sections are useful and which ones you can skip altogether.

Reading Individual ArticlesArticles within newspapers and magazines tend to be of three main types:

News Articles — Here, the most important information is presented first; the information is generally less useful as the article progresses. News articles are designed to explain the key points first, followed by detail.

Opinion Pieces — Opinion articles present a point of view. Here, the most important information is contained in the introduction and the summary, with the middle of the article containing supporting arguments.

Features — These are written to provide entertainment or background on a subject. Typically the most important information is in the body of the text. If you know what you want from an article, and recognize its type, you can extract information from it quickly and efficiently.

#5 Reading “whole subject” documents
 — When you are reading an important document, it is easy to accept the writer’s structure of thought. This can mean that you may not notice that important information has been omitted or that irrelevant detail has been included. A good way of recognizing this is to compile your own table of contents before you open the document. You can then use this table of contents to read the document in the order that you want. You will be able to spot omissions quickly. This is why left margin subtitles with right margin text make easy reading of this kind of material.

Background This project developed out of a need for easy access to playground equipment as a way to encourage physical activity in secondary school children.

Basic Science & Philosophy Exertion leads to accomplishment. Things not ventured are not gained. The natural urge to accomplish and fit in is more easily satisfied with simple exercise and equipment. Not everyone is a natural athlete, but most find acceptable levels of athleticism when exercise is cooperative and fun, such as pushing a merry-go-round and jumping on to join others in the accomplishment.

#6 Using glossaries with technical documents
 — If you are reading large amounts of difficult technical material, it may be useful to photocopy or compile a glossary. Keep this beside you as you read. It will probably also be useful to note down the key concepts in your own words and refer to them when necessary, again using “concept” mapping — a good study method for students.

Whatever your need or desire for reading, good readers are made, not born. Give it a try. If you do, I’m betting that you’ll be reading more success in your tealeaves.

October 26, 2018 |

Students Rehearse for Carmel High School’s Production of “The Matchmaker”

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The Carmel High School Drama Club is deep in rehearsal for Thornton Wilder’s The Matchmaker. Julie Daza and Anthony Velez, under the guidance of the club’s Drama Advisor, Margaret Carey, direct this classic comedy. Wilder’s uproarious farce about love and money stars the irrepressible busybody, Dolly Gallagher Levi (Alieyah Brown), who inspired the Broadway musical, Hello, Dolly! Through Dolly’s subtle machinations, several unlikely couples come together to find happiness in 19th-century New York.

The talented cast of Carmel High School students includes Benjamin Antoniuk, Morgan Argentieri, Alieyah Brown, Franchesca Cabrera, Mariana Daza, Allison Devane, Julia  Field , Jen Gerace, Matthew Gianfransico , Jake Groundwater, Ben Hitchcock, Lauren Hoffmann, Hannah Loughran, Ayden Mallegol, Ashlyn Manfro,, William  Meyers, Olivia Murillo, Stephanie Ogbebor, Madeline Olsen, Amanda Purr, Jimmy Purr, Melissa Rice, Allison Sanel, Beck  Spears, Ashley Suppa, Angelina  Trongone, and Caelyn Tuffy.

CHS Senior Lydia Rubin is the Stage Manager for the student crew Meaghan Connors, Tiffany Duch, Adam Friedman, Autumn Laughlin, Emily Medina, Tessa Price, Kayleigh Ravert, Clark Rubin, and Meg Young.

Take a trip to nineteenth-century New York and meet the cast of characters including the curmudgeon, Horace Vandergelder, his clerks, several lovely ladies, waiters of a fancy restaurant and, of course, the irrepressible, Dolly Levi.

The Matchmaker performances will be held on Friday, November 9 @ 7:30PM and Saturday, November 10 @ 2:00PM and 7:30PM at Carmel High School, Casey Hall 30 Fair Street, Carmel NY. Advanced tickets are available online at http://carmeldramaclub.weebly.com

“The Matchmaker” is presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC.

 

Matchmaker, Dolly Gallagher Levi (Alieyah Brown) tries to find the perfect match for Yonkers businessman, Horace Vandergelder (Ben Hitchcock).

 

 

Cast and crew of The Matchmaker.

 

 

October 25, 2018 |

Business Professionals Invited to Connect at Master Networks Mixer

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November 14 Master Networks Mixer to be held at Moonlight Café in Brewster

The Brewster-Carmel Chapter of Master Networks invites you to attend their November 14 Mixer at Moonlight Café 850 Route 22 in Brewster from 6-9pm. Moonlight Cafe is a “relaxed food joint” with a newly opened bar. They have a variety of food & beverages available for purchase including vegan options, desserts. kombucha & nitro coffee. Enjoy live music by Riley Krisch while you network with like-minded individuals.

Learn how Master Networks can grow your business through building relationships and enjoy a great evening of conversation and connection.

For more information contact:

CoachGlo at 914.204.1703

Laurie Spens at LSpens@comcast.net

Margaret Carey  at MargaretC@HamletHub.com

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About Master Networks, Inc.
Master Networks is a cutting-edge training, development and referral network. Chapters meet weekly for pragmatic, hands-on training that can be applied to members’ businesses. Members also agree to refer business to one another every week. For more information, visit www.masternetworksnyct.com

Twitter: @MNTristate

Instagram: @networkingnyct

Facebook:

www.facebook.com/Masternetworksbrewster/

www.facebook.com/masternetworkstristate/

 

October 24, 2018 |

Halloween Safety

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Bits & Pieces Column

Helpful Chitchat

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Evelyn J. Mocbeichel

 

 

It is fun to see homes all decked out in both Halloween and autumn décor, signaling the end of one season and the start of another. For young children, Halloween excitement surrounding both fun and CANDY is building whether they go trick-or-treating or attend parties.

It is up to parents and caregivers to be extra vigilant when it comes to keeping children safe during these festivities. It goes without saying that an adult should accompany young children when they go trick-or-treating. Some towns organize parades or Halloween parties sponsored by civic groups or school organizations. These are also fun for children, eliminating the need to go door-to-door. However, if your child will be going out on Halloween night, here are some tips from the U.S. Government General Services Administration and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission that parents should keep in mind.

Safety

When shopping for a costume, try to coax your child into choosing a brightly colored costume that is visible and that will make it easier for cars to see them on dark roads. For darker colored costumes, stick some reflective tape on the costume to increase visibility. Also put tape on the tote bags they are using to hold their candy. Make sure they are carrying a flashlight or glow stick. Use face paint instead of a mask that might obstruct their view.   Before the holiday, test all makeup to insure the child is not allergic to its ingredients. Avoid costumes that are below their shoe line or have flowing capes or skirts that might cause them to trip. Make sure your child’s Halloween costume is flame resistant in the event a cape or part of the costume does come in contact with a flame. (Some homes might have candles inside of carved pumpkins on the front porch or steps.)

It is tempting for children to eat the treats they are receiving along the way, but try to advise them not to do this. Discard any candy that looks opened or partially unwrapped or contains homemade goods if you do not personally know the giver. It seems such a shame to discard homemade items, but it’s better to err on the side of safety rather than worry about wasting food.

Perhaps an even better option might be to give out gift certificates. Some fast food establishments offer really low cost coupon booklets with coupons for free cones, cookies or small burgers. This is a smart marketing idea, as the restaurants know that parents will also come and order a meal for themselves or older children when they hand in the Halloween coupon for a free item.

While on the subject of checking the treats children receive, parents of very young children should remove items that contain choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies or small toys before the child gets hold of them.

Pedestrian safety is vital and children should be cautioned against running out between parked cars or across lawns and yards where ornaments, furniture, clotheslines or lawn sprinklers present dangers. Sturdy shoes or sneakers are a must, and mommy’s high heels should be avoided for little girls’ dress-up costumes.

Wishing everyone a safe, fun and Happy Halloween!

October 24, 2018 |
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