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Simplify and Savor Dinner with Bold Flavors

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Family Features) A busy day doesn’t have to come between you and your favorite people at mealtime. With a little creativity and a simple ingredient like olive oil, you can set the table with flavorful meals and surround yourself with the company of friends and family, enjoying the experience together.

There’s no need to get complicated when you have quality ingredients like olive oil to add some extra zest. You can have flavor at the ready with Olive Oil Ice Cubes, for example. Add fresh herbs from your garden to an ice cube tray then fill with smooth, light and flavorful olive oil and freeze. Whenever you need to get the flavor sizzling, simply toss a cube into the pan.

Create a nearly effortless dressing with olive oil for a recipe like Arugula Salad with Goat Cheese, Berries and Pecans. White fish fillets like cod also pair well with an olive oil-based pesto, which can help ensure you’re prepared for any stressful day that dares to challenge your time around the table, allowing you to enjoy life’s pure moments. Olive oil even adds flavor to sweet and succulent desserts, such as Chocolate-Pumpkin Cake.

When the minutes start to slip away, capture them back with recipes that use olive oil to create meals you can feel good about while savoring the company of those around you.

Make every moment count and find more simple, enjoyable recipes at Bertolli.com.

Arugula Salad with Goat Cheese, Berries and Pecans

Prep time: 15 minutes

Servings: 1-2

7          cups arugula

2          ounces goat cheese

1/2       cup pecans, toasted

1          cup mixed berries (such as blackberries or strawberries)

 

Dressing:

2          tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

1          tablespoon finely minced shallots

1          tablespoon honey

1/4       teaspoon kosher salt

1/4       cup Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil

 

In bowl, toss arugula, goat cheese, pecans and mixed berries.

To make dressing: In bowl, mix lemon juice, shallots, honey, salt and olive oil.

Add dressing to salad for serving.

 

White Fish Fillets with Pesto

Total time: 15 minutes

Servings: 2

Fish:

2          cod fillets (about 7 ounces each)

salt, to taste

Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil, to taste

Red Pesto:

1          bunch basil

1          ounce cashews

3/4       ounce Parmesan cheese

Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil

water

To prepare fish: Rub both sides of fillets with salt and olive oil while heating saucepan.

Sear fillets meat-side first followed by skin-side.

Heat oven to 350 F.

To make Red Pesto: Puree basil, cashews, Parmesan cheese and olive oil while adding small amount of water.

Add additional olive oil as necessary, ensuring sauce is thick enough to cover fish.

Place fish in oven tray, cover with Red Pesto and bake 5 minutes.

 

Chocolate-Pumpkin Cake

Total time: 20 minutes

2          eggs

4 1/2    ounces sugar

4 1/2    ounces Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil

4 1/2    ounces flour

1/3       ounce cocoa powder

1/8       ounce salt

5 1/4    ounces pumpkin

1/10     ounce baking powder

Heat oven to 350 F.

Mix eggs with sugar thoroughly and beat until bubbles form. Slowly add in olive oil while continuing to stir mixture.

Add flour, cocoa powder, salt, pumpkin and baking powder; using whisk, mix well.

Pour into cake mold lined with baking paper and bake 15 minutes.

Let cool and remove cake from mold.

 

Olive Oil Cubes

Assorted herbs

ice cube trays

Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Break up herbs by hand. Add herbs to trays. Fill trays with olive oil and gently set in freezer; allow to solidify.

When cooking, use cubes for added flavor.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images (Arugula Salad with Goat Cheese, Berries and Pecans, Olive Oil Cubes)

 

 

 

 

November 7, 2018 |

Exquisite Eating

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Small plates to make for appealing dishes

(Family Features) Imagine treating yourself and your dinner guests to a delicious, restaurant-caliber meal without leaving your dining room or hiring a personal chef. Small plates, also known as tapas, are lighter, bite-sized indulgences that you can prepare and style seamlessly. By putting your own artful, unique spin on small plates, you can indulge in a meal that appeals to the senses and conveys sophistication.

It can be easy to create delicious small plates: all you need are wholesome, seasonal ingredients to pair with an artisan-crafted, quality olive oil such as Carapelli. The line, with three varieties to explore, brings a renaissance to the modern kitchen and is ideal for endeavoring chefs looking to try new flavors and experiment with tastes or recipes. It embodies a true passion for the art of creating extra-virgin olive oils and is designed to lift cooks out of the everyday cooking experience.

Keep in mind that when it comes to small plates, what’s important isn’t just the recipe, but the plate – and plating – of the cuisine itself. Foods that appeal to the eye are likely to tempt the taste buds as well. Invest in appropriate-sized dishware for small plates that allows the food to take center-stage.

For a true multi-sensory indulgence, also take time to garnish your dishes, big and small, with edible enhancements that lend a subtle complement to the main attraction. A selection of fresh greens, sprinkling of herbs and even a light drizzle of olive oil can do the trick.

Plan how you’ll adapt your favorite dishes for size – and season – with more tips and recipes at carapelliusa.com.

Carrots and Fresh Herbs with Champagne-Dijon Vinaigrette

Prep time: 10 minutes

Servings: 6

Champagne-Dijon Vinaigrette:

2          tablespoons champagne vinegar

1          teaspoon Dijon Mustard

1          tablespoon clover honey

1/2       cup Carapelli Organic Olive Oil

1/2       teaspoon garlic, minced

1/2       teaspoon sea salt

1/4       teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1          teaspoon fresh parsley, finely chopped

1          teaspoon basil, finely chopped

1          pound carrots, peeled and finely shredded

2          tablespoons Italian parsley, chopped

2          tablespoons chives, thinly sliced, plus more cut into 3/4-inch pieces, for garnish

1/3       cup Champagne Vinaigrette

fine sea salt, to taste

freshly ground black pepper, to taste

chive sticks, for garnish

 

In medium mixing bowl, combine champagne vinegar, Dijon and honey. Whisk constantly until well combined. While whisking, slowly drizzle in olive oil to emulsify. Add garlic, salt, pepper, parsley and basil: whisk to combine.

In mixing bowl, toss carrots, parsley and chives. Add dressing. Season, to taste, with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Garnish with chive sticks.

Notes: Vinaigrette can be stored in refrigerator up to five days. For zestier salad, add additional 2 tablespoons vinaigrette to carrots; serve with crusty bread.

Whipped Ricotta and Goat Cheese Beet Skewers

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 3 hours, plus cooling time

Servings: 42 skewers

Beets:

2          beets (about 1 pound), 3 inches in diameter, peeled and sliced into 3/4-inch chunks

1          tablespoon Carapelli Oro Verde Extra Virgin Olive Oil, plus more for drizzling

1/2       teaspoon fresh thyme leaves

1          teaspoon sea salt

arugula, for garnish

flaked sea salt, for garnish

Whipped Ricotta and Goat Cheese:

4          ounces goat cheese

1/4       cup whole milk ricotta cheese

1          tablespoon Carapelli Oro Verde Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1/4       teaspoon lemon zest

1/8       teaspoon sea salt

1/8       teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 

Heat sous vide water bath to 185 F.

In mixing bowl, combine beets, olive oil, thyme and salt; toss to coat. Remove beets from liquid and divide, placing them in single layer into two quart-sized vacuum-seal bags, leaving any excess liquid behind.

Use vacuum sealer to remove air and double-seal bag. To use zip-top bags instead, slowly dip slightly open bags into large container filled with water, allowing water to displace air. Seal bags when air is removed.

Place vacuum-sealed bag into prepared water bath, placing heavy, heat-resistant bowl on top of beets to keep them submerged, if necessary. Cook 3 hours.

If you do not have a sous vide machine, bring large stock pot filled with water to rolling boil. Place vacuum-sealed bags in water. Reduce to gentle simmer, cover and cook 1 hour.

Carefully remove beets from water bath and cool in sealed bag until they reach room temperature, about 30 minutes. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes more before serving.

In mini food processor, cream goat cheese, ricotta and olive oil until smooth. Add zest, salt and pepper: stir to combine.

Transfer cheese mixture to piping bag fitted with star tip and refrigerate until ready to use.

To serve, remove beets from bag and arrange on serving platter. Pipe dollop of Whipped Ricotta and Goat Cheese onto each beet. Drizzle with olive oil.

Garnish with arugula and pinch of flaked sea salt; place skewer through each beet to serve.

Olive Oil Drizzled Pecorino Popcorn

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 5 minutes

Servings: 4

1/2       cup grated pecorino, plus more for garnish

1/2       teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more for garnish

3          tablespoons Carapelli Unfiltered Extra Virgin Olive Oil, divided

1/3       cup yellow popcorn kernels

In bowl, combine pecorino and pepper; mix until well combined and there are no cheese clumps.

In small saucepan over low flame, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil; keep warm.

Add remaining olive oil and popcorn to large Dutch oven. Stir until all popcorn kernels are coated in oil.

Cover Dutch oven with lid and cook over medium-high heat, shaking pot periodically. Once popcorn begins to pop, lower heat to medium and continue to shake pot approximately every 15 seconds. When popping slows considerably, remove Dutch oven from heat and allow to rest until popping ceases, about 30 seconds.

Remove lid and transfer popcorn to large mixing bowl. Drizzle warm olive oil over popcorn; toss to coat. Sprinkle cheese mixture over popcorn; toss to coat.

Divide popcorn into bowls. Sprinkle some freshly grated pecorino and dash of freshly ground black pepper over top; serve.

October 31, 2018 |

New Research Links Refrigerator Staple to Teenage Height

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study finds drinking more milk growing up is associated with increased height at 17

(Family Features) Drinking real dairy milk is especially important for growing kids, and new research suggests regularly drinking more milk throughout childhood is associated with an increase in teenage height, according to a new study in “The Journal of Nutrition.”[i]

Researchers followed more than 700 kids from the time they were born, analyzing their height and diet from ages 2-17, and found each additional glass of milk kids drank per day throughout childhood increased their height at age 17 by around 0.39 centimeters. That means the more milk kids drank regularly growing up, the taller they were. Water and other beverages, including 100 percent juice and sugar-sweetened beverages, didn’t have the same effect.

These findings add to a growing body of research that suggests regularly drinking milk during the growing years is associated with greater height in the teen years, while regularly skipping milk or drinking non-dairy milk alternatives, like almond or soy milk, is linked to shorter height.[ii],[iii],[iv]

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend two cups of milk and milk products each day for kids ages 2-3, two and a half cups each day for kids 4-8 and three cups each day for kids 9-18. While it’s hard for kids to get nutrients they need to grow strong without milk in their diets, eighty-five percent of Americans fall short of these daily recommendations, which includes most children over 3 years old.[v],[vi]

Serving an eight-ounce glass of milk alongside meals or snacks is an easy way to give kids nine essential nutrients, including high-quality protein, and get them closer to these recommendations. Try pairing these homemade cereal bars from Jamielyn Nye, author of iheartnaptime.net, with a cold glass of milk for an easy after-school snack, and find more kid-approved recipes at pourmoremilk.com.

Homemade Cereal Bars

Recipe courtesy of Jamielyn Nye, author of iheartnaptime.net, on behalf of Milk Life

Servings: 16

1/2      cup peanut butter

1/2      cup honey

1/2       teaspoon vanilla

3 1/2    cups dry cereal

 

Line 8-by-8-inch pan with parchment paper and set aside.

In a medium size sauce pan, combine peanut butter and honey and cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla.

Add in dry cereal and stir until completely coated then press into lined pan. Use piece of parchment paper to press firmly down on bars.

Refrigerate bars 1 hour, or until ready to serve.

Serve with eight-ounce glass of milk.

Nutritional information per serving: 180 calories; 4 1/2 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 5 mg cholesterol; 10 g protein; 26 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 160 mg sodium; 306 mg calcium (30% of daily value). Nutrition figures include an eight-ounce glass of fat free milk.

 

[i] Marshall TA, Curtis AM, Cavanaugh JE, Warren JJ, Levy SM. Higher longitudinal milk intakes are associated with increased height in a birth cohort followed for 17 years. The Journal of Nutrition. 2018;148(7):1144-1149.

[ii] Wiley AS. Does milk make children grow? Releationships between milk consumption and height in NHANES 1999-2002. American Journal of Human Biology. 2005;17(4):425-441.

[iii] Rockell JEP, Williams SM, Taylor RW, Grant AM, Jones IE, Goulding A. Two-year changes in bone and body composition in young children with a history of prolonged milk avoidance. Osteoporosis International. 2005;16(9):1016-1023.

[iv] Morency M, Birken CS, Lebovic G, Chen Y, L’Abbé M, Lee GJ, Maguire JL and the TARGet Kids! Collaboration. Association between noncow milk beverage consumption and childhood height. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017;106(2):597-602.

[v] Krebs-Smith SM, Guenther PM, Subar AF, Kirkpatrick SI, Dodd KW. Americans do not meet federal dietary recommendations. The Journal of Nutrition. 2010;140:1832-1838.

[vi] U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015. 8th Edition, 2015.

 

 

October 24, 2018 |

What’s in the Can May Surprise You

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooking with canned foods combines convenience and nutrition

(Family Features) Simple, convenient and versatile, canned foods provide an array of options for families looking to increase nutrition during mealtimes. However, some home chefs may not be aware of the benefits canned foods bring to the table.

Consider these common consumer misnomers cleared up by the Canned Food Alliance:

Myth: Canned foods don’t count toward dietary goals.

Fact: Canned foods provide important nutrients that deliver on the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines, as all forms of fruits, vegetables, beans, meats and seafood – whether fresh, frozen, canned or dried – are recommended to help ensure a proper balance of nutrients. In fact, according to a survey conducted by the Canned Food Alliance, 95 percent of health professionals surveyed agree that all forms of food, including canned, can help consumers meet the USDA’s MyPlate fruit and vegetable recommendations.

Myth: Canned foods aren’t as nutritious as fresh or frozen foods.

Fact: Research published in the “Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture” shows canned foods can be as nutritious, and in some cases more nutritious, than fresh and frozen counterparts.

Myth: Canned foods are filled with preservatives.

Fact: Because canned foods have already been cooked, preservatives aren’t necessary to prevent spoilage. The canning process itself preserves the food.

Myth: Canned foods are highly processed.

Fact: Once canned fruits and vegetables are picked and packed near peak ripeness, they’re cooked quickly at high temperatures to lock in nutrients, similar to the home-canning process.

Myth: Canned foods are high in sodium.

Fact: Salt and sodium aren’t required for preservation of canned foods, and low- and no-sodium canned food options are available. Additionally, draining and rinsing canned foods can further reduce sodium by up to 41 percent.

Find more canned food facts and recipes at mealtime.org.

Chipotle Pumpkin Black Bean Chili

Recipe courtesy of the Canned Food Alliance

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 60-70 minutes

Servings: 4-6

2             tablespoons vegetable oil

1             onion, chopped

1             rib celery, chopped

2             jalapenos, seeded and chopped

3             cloves garlic, minced

1             teaspoon ground cumin

1             teaspoon dried oregano

1/4         teaspoon ground pepper

2             tablespoons tomato paste

1             can (28 ounces) no-salt added canned diced tomatoes

1             cup canned pureed pumpkin

1             cup no-salt-added canned chicken broth

1             can no-salt-added canned black beans, drained and rinsed

1             can (12 1/2 ounces) no-salt-added chicken, drained

1             chipotle in adobo sauce, finely chopped

1             teaspoon brown sugar

salt, to taste

2            green onions, finely chopped

lime wedges, for serving

In Dutch oven or large saucepan over medium heat, heat oil. Add onions, celery, jalapenos, garlic, cumin, oregano and pepper. Cook, stirring, 5-8 minutes, or until vegetables soften. Add tomato paste and cook 2 minutes.

Add tomatoes, pumpkin puree, chicken broth, black beans, chicken, chipotles and brown sugar. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low. Simmer, stirring occasionally, 1 hour, or until chili thickens. Add salt, to taste.

Garnish with green onions and serve with lime wedges.

Tip: Add preferred canned beans, such as white kidney beans, pinto or Romano beans, in place of or in addition to black beans.

Nutritional information per serving: 240 calories; 6 g fat; 35 mg cholesterol; 210 mg sodium; 29 g carbohydrates; 8 g fiber; 8 g sugar; 18 g protein; 7,390 IU vitamin A; 35 mg vitamin C; 98 mg calcium; 3.2 mg iron.

October 17, 2018 |

Eat Healthy with Seafood

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Family Features) Eating healthy isn’t always easy, and when your family is rushing around in the evenings it can seem like a daunting task to put a well-balanced, nutritious meal on the table.

However, cooking at home with a lean protein you can feel good about serving, like seafood, is one way to serve up quick, good-for-you meals. In fact, one-third of people surveyed reported they increased their fish consumption at home in the past year, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Research published in the “Journal of the American Medical Association” showed eating seafood 2-3 times per week can improve brain, eye, heart and prenatal health. Seafood also provides unique health benefits as one of the best sources for omega-3 fatty acids, which are healthy fats essential to human health and development.

As only one out of 10 Americans meets the Dietary Guidelines recommendation of two servings of seafood per week, National Seafood Month is a great time to incorporate more seafood into you and your family’s meals. Check out these tips from the Seafood Nutrition Partnership:

  • Make a game plan or meal plan for the week to figure out when you can incorporate seafood into your meals.
  • Stock up on canned and frozen seafood at the grocery store and keep an eye out for sales or coupons.
  • Make easy swaps, like using white fish or shrimp in tacos instead of beef or a salmon patty instead of a burger patty.
  • Try doubling recipes so you only have to cook it once but can reap the benefits of eating seafood twice in one week.
  • Use kitchen gadgets like slow cookers and pressure cookers to prepare seafood-based meals in a pinch.

For recipes, ideas and inspiration for eating seafood at least two times per week, visit seafoodnutrition.org or follow #Seafood2xWk on social media.

One Pan Fish Dish

Recipe courtesy of Michael-Ann Rowe on behalf of the Seafood Nutrition Partnership

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes

Servings: 4

1/8        cup canola oil

1/4        cup cherry tomatoes, halved

1           medium onion, quartered

2           cups broccoli florets

1           lemon, half sliced and half juiced, divided

kosher salt, to taste

freshly ground pepper, to taste

1            pound white fish (such as snapper, grouper, flounder or barramundi)

4            tablespoons olive oil

fresh rosemary sprigs (optional)

In pan over medium heat, heat canola oil about 1 minute.

Add tomatoes, onions and broccoli to pan; cook 5 minutes, uncovered.

Drizzle lemon juice over vegetables and season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Place fish on top of vegetables in center of pan and place two lemon slices on top of fish.

Sprinkle with salt and pepper, to taste.

Cover pan and cook on medium heat 10-12 minutes depending on thickness of fish.

Drizzle olive oil over fish and top with rosemary, if desired, before serving.

 

October 10, 2018 |

Fast, Family-Friendly Recipes Make Dinner Doable

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Family Features) As the fall season begins, kids go back to school and schedules once again book up with activities.

Between work, the carpool line and shuttling kids to extracurriculars, the increase in family commitments often leaves little time in the kitchen or at the dining table. Although the drive-thru is an easy solution, healthier options can be scarce and the cost of takeout piles up. Instead, add some quick family meals to your arsenal.

Southwestern Bean Mexican Pizza made with READ Southwestern Bean Salad is a fun twist on the Italian favorite that pairs perfectly with fruit, carrot sticks or a salad for a complete, family-friendly meal

For an easy make-ahead option, grab a jar of Aunt Nellie’s Beets and make Beef, Beet and Horseradish Wraps. Both recipes can help you have dinner on the table in 30 minutes or less.

For more quick and easy dinner ideas, visit READSalads.com and AuntNellies.com.

Southwestern Bean Mexican Pizza

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

Servings: 8-10

 

2                  cans (15 ounces each) READ Southwestern Bean Salad
1                   pre-baked pizza crust (10-12-inch diameter)
4                  slices bacon, cooked crisp and crumbled (about 1/4 cup crumbled)
1/2-3/4      cup thin bell pepper strips (1/4-inch thick), any color or combination
3/4             cup shredded Mexican cheese blend
1/4              cup chopped fresh cilantro
chopped avocado (optional)
sour cream (optional)

 

Drain bean salads. Place half of beans in bowl of food processor; process until pureed but chunky.

Spread puree evenly over pizza crust. Spoon remaining drained beans over puree. Sprinkle with bacon, bell pepper and cheese.

Bake as directed on pizza crust package until heated through and cheese is melted, about 10-12 minutes.

Sprinkle with chopped cilantro. Serve with avocado and sour cream, if desired.

Nutritional information per serving: 276 calories; 11 g protein; 35 g carbohydrates; 10 g fat; 648 mg sodium; 14 mg cholesterol; 5 g dietary fiber; 11 mg iron; .02 mg thiamin; 575 IU vitamin A; 7 mg vitamin C.

 

Beef, Beet and Horseradish Wraps

Prep time: 30 minutes

Servings: 4

1              jar (16 ounces) Aunt Nellie’s Sliced Pickled Beets
1/2         cup shredded carrots
1             tablespoon prepared horseradish
1/2         cup spreadable cheese (such as goat cheese or herb soft cheese)
2             large soft flour tortillas (about 10-12-inch diameter)
10           green onions (green parts only)
10           thin slices deli roast beef

 

Drain beets; chop. Discard beet liquid. In medium bowl, combine beets, carrots and horseradish.

Spread 1/4 cup cheese evenly over each tortilla, leaving 1-inch border. Arrange five green onions (do not chop) on each; press lightly into cheese. Place five slices roast beef on each tortilla to cover green onions then sprinkle beet mixture evenly over beef.

Roll up tortillas in parallel direction of green onions. Wrap each roll tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate up to 4 hours.

To serve, remove plastic wrap; cut each tortilla into two pieces.

Substitution: If horseradish is too pungent, omit or replace with diced jarred roasted red peppers or Dijon mustard.

Nutrition information per serving: 300 calories; 17 g protein; 34 g carbohydrates; 10 g fat; 520 mg sodium; 35 mg cholesterol

2 g fiber; 3.18 mg iron; .26 mg thiamin; 2963.87 IU vitamin A; 8.79 mg vitamin C.

October 3, 2018 |

Fall for a Flavorful Cheese Board

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In Good Taste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Family Features) Some of the most beloved flavors are inspired during the fall, and there are few better ways to enjoy the season’s best than with a group of friends and family. Get ready to wow guests with seasonal treats that invite everyone to indulge in fall flavors.

Even adults can enjoy getting hands-on with their food when it comes to stacking up mouth-watering ingredients, and a fall party is a great opportunity to explore new ways to appreciate the flavor of savory pumpkin.

This recipe combines rich, creamy cheese with prosciutto and pumpkin for a medley of flavors and textures your guests will have a hard time believing are gluten-free. The star is non-GMO Crunchmaster Pumpkin Harvest Crackers, which combine real pumpkin and autumn spices with whole grains and flax seeds.

Serve these little delights on a cheese board and let guests mix and match the flavors as they wish. Then expand your offering with a dairy-free, vegan alternative and introduce another fall favorite like apple butter.

Explore more tips and recipes to help celebrate fall at crunchmaster.com.

Pumpkin Prosciutto Stackers

2          ounces prosciutto

1          ounce aged balsamic vinegar (syrupy consistency)

4          ounces gorgonzola

4          ounces aged Parmesan, shaved

1          bag Crunchmaster Pumpkin Harvest Crackers

Cut prosciutto into cracker-size pieces, about 1 1/2 inches in diameter.

Pour vinegar into small carafe or dish with serving spoon.

Layer gorgonzola, 1-2 pieces prosciutto and 1-2 pieces shaved Parmesan on one cracker. Drizzle lightly with vinegar. Place on wooden or slate serving platter to serve as inspiration to guests. Plate remaining prosciutto, gorgonzola, Parmesan and crackers on platter before serving and place vinegar nearby.

Apple Pepita Stackers

4          ounces apple butter

1          bag Crunchmaster Pumpkin Harvest Crackers

3          ounces toasted pepitas

12        slivers fresh sage

Spread apple butter over one cracker and sprinkle with pinch of pepitas. Top with sage sliver.

For serving, scoop apple butter into small crock or serving vessel. Place pepitas and sage in serving dishes. Place assembled stacker on platter with crackers. Add serving dishes, if space allows, or position around platter.

September 26, 2018 |
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