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A Fit, Fun Summer

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To Your Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make smart fitness choices with post-workout recovery and hydration

(Family Features) During warm-weather months, fitness enthusiasts often take their exercise routines to the great outdoors. The spike in summer temperatures can make those tough workouts even more challenging.

Even after your workout is complete, your body does not stop – after a tough sweat session in the summer heat, you need to replenish what you lost to rebuild and refuel muscles. A tall glass of chocolate milk may not be the first thing you think to reach for after a long run, but recovering from each intense workout with the nutrients in low-fat chocolate milk allows you to get the most out of your fitness routine.

Before gearing up for your summer workout routine, make sure you are taking care of your body with these tips.


Be Mindful of High Temperatures
High temperatures don’t have to get in the way of your workout plan, but it’s important to consider the heat index and time of day when exercising. Temperatures typically peak during the middle of the day, so aim to work out in the morning or once the sun starts to set.

The body loses a lot of important nutrients through sweat. Learn your sweat rate by weighing yourself with minimal clothing before and after one hour of sweaty exercise. One pound of sweat loss equals 16 ounces of fluid loss. This can guide your fluid intake during your next workout.

Replenish What You Lose in Sweat

After putting in real work this summer, your body needs real recovery. Recovery after strenuous exercise can make a difference in how well you can perform during your next workout. For example, low-fat chocolate milk helps replenish fluids and electrolytes lost in sweat. In fact, drinking low-fat or fat-free milk after exercise could restore hydration better than other popular post-exercise beverages, including water or sports drinks, according to a study published in the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.” Plus, chocolate milk has a 3-to-1 carb-to-protein ratio scientifically shown to refuel and rebuild muscles quickly.


Shield Yourself from the Sun’s Rays

Just because your fitness routine includes strenuous laps in a pool or a run through shady trails doesn’t mean you are protected from the sun. Apply sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher to your face, neck, ears and body before exercising outdoors. If you’re going back out for another round of laps in the pool or around the track, reapply sunscreen 20-30 minutes before getting back to work.

While summer weather provides many opportunities for fresh air and fitness, it’s important to remember these tips and more for healthy hydration. Find more information at builtwithchocolatemilk.com.

 

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

July 11, 2018 |

Treatment Options for Men with Enlarged Prostate

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(Family Features) If you’re a male over the age of 45, chances are you may be suffering from a condition more common than prostate cancer – benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). More commonly known as enlarged prostate, BPH can cause bothersome urinary symptoms that can worsen with age. In fact, nearly 40 million men in the United States are affected by enlarged prostate, according to research published in the “Journal of Urology.”

During Men’s Health Month, consider these steps from the experts at NeoTract, Inc., manufacturer of the UroLift System, for alleviating enlarged prostate symptoms:

Signs You Should See a Urologist

An enlarged prostate obstructs the bladder opening and can lead to a myriad of bothersome urinary symptoms. Symptoms of BPH include frequent urination, a weak or slow urine stream, incomplete bladder emptying, difficulty or delay in starting urination and a urine stream that stops and starts. It’s important to see a physician if any of these problems arise or persist.

Enlarged prostate can also cause loss of productivity and sleep and, in some cases, can lead to depression. According to a survey sponsored by NeoTract, one of the most common symptoms of BPH – interrupted sleep – is also impacting men’s partners. Sixty-four percent of women surveyed who were affected by their partners’ BPH symptoms said it impacts their sleep, too.

Traditional Treatment Options

Medication is often the first-line therapy for enlarged prostate, but relief can be inadequate and temporary. Some patients may suffer uncomfortable side effects from the medications, including dizziness, headaches and sexual dysfunction, which can prompt them to quit using the drugs.

“Medical and surgical treatments for BPH ranging from medications to surgery have been used for decades with varying degrees of success and side effects,” said Dr. David O. Sussman, DO, FACOS. “Medications can be helpful in relieving symptoms for some men, but patients must continue taking them long-term to maintain the effects.”

The classic alternative for patients who opt against medication is surgery that cuts, heats or removes prostate tissue to open the blocked urethra. Sussman said surgical options such as transurethral resection of the prostate or photovaporization of the prostate are usually effective. However, these options typically require general anesthesia, overnight hospitalization and post-operative catheterization. Surgery can also increase the risk of erectile dysfunction or loss of ejaculation.

An Alternative Treatment Method

Another option for men looking to relieve their BPH symptoms without undergoing major surgery or taking long-term BPH medications is the UroLift System treatment, a minimally invasive procedure that takes less than an hour and doesn’t require any cutting, heating or removal of prostate tissue.

A urologist uses the device to lift and move the enlarged prostate tissue out of the way so it no longer blocks the urethra (the passageway that urine flows through). Tiny implants are then used to hold the tissue in place, leaving an unobstructed pathway for urine to flow through normally.

Most common side effects are mild-to-moderate and include pain or burning with urination, blood in urine, pelvic pain, urgent need to urinate or the inability to control the urge. The procedure has a low catheter rate and most symptoms resolve within 2-4 weeks after the procedure.

To learn more, visit UroLift.com.

 

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images (Man at the doctors)

 

July 3, 2018 |

10 Steps to Help Prevent Cancer

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(Family Features) Nearly 4 out of 10 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetimes, and it remains the second-leading cause of death for Americans, but nearly half of all cancer cases can be prevented.

Research from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) shows that diet, exercise and weight play a critical role in cancer prevention.

“Making changes in what you eat, being physically active and maintaining a healthy weight have strong and clear links to your risk for cancer,” said Alice Bender, MS, RDN and director of nutrition programs at AICR. “We know from decades of research and a thorough review of the science that there are simple things we can all do to reduce our risk.”

To live a cancer-preventive lifestyle, consider taking these 10 steps recommended by the scientific experts at AICR:

  1. Be a healthy weight. Higher body fat can be a cause of many cancers. Try to stay at a healthy weight and avoid weight gain as you get older.
  2. Be physically active. Incorporate moderate physical activity into your daily life through steps like walking more and sitting less.
  3. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans. Make these foods a major part of your diet.
  4. Limit consumption of “fast foods” and other processed foods high in fat, starches or sugars. Cut down on processed foods to help control calorie intake and maintain a healthy weight.
  5. Limit consumption of red and processed meat. Eat no more than three portions of red meat per week, and little – if any – processed meat.
  6. Limit consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks. Don’t drink sugar-sweetened drinks, which contribute to weight gain. Choose water instead, when possible.
  7. Limit alcohol consumption. For preventing cancer, it’s best not to drink alcohol.
  8. Do not use supplements for cancer prevention. Aim to meet nutritional needs through diet alone.
  9. For mothers, breastfeed your baby, if you can. Breastfeeding is good for both mother and baby.
  10. After a cancer diagnosis, follow these recommendations, if you can. Cancer survivors are encouraged to continue following these guidelines.

Refraining from smoking, avoiding other exposure to tobacco and limiting sun exposure are also important in reducing cancer risk.

Because it can be hard to make lifestyle changes, AICR aims to help people adopt healthier behaviors through efforts like the Cancer Health Check, a tool that shows people how their lifestyle stacks up against known cancer risks and recommends changes that can improve health.

For recipes, tips and other resources, visit aicr.org.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

June 27, 2018 |

5 Tips for Healthy Summer Hydration

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(Family Features) Summer provides countless opportunities to get outside for hiking, biking and running around with friends and family. However, having fun in the sun also requires proper hydration.

While staying hydrated may seem easy, healthy hydration is not always a given. For example, the water coming out of your faucet can travel through miles of aging pipes before it reaches your home, potentially picking up unwanted contaminants such as lead, pesticides and industrial pollutants along the way.

These tips can assist in achieving healthy hydration throughout the summer months:

Drink Plenty of Water. It may seem simple, but consuming an appropriate amount of water can be especially important when temperatures reach sweltering levels. Since the human body is 60 percent water, it’s a vital step for your health to make sure you’re getting enough of it, which is why Healthline recommends 6-8 glasses (8 ounces each) of water per day.

Make Sure It’s Pure. In addition to drinking the right amount of water, it’s also important to drink the right kind of water. Consider installing an in-home filtered water solution like the PUR Advanced Faucet Filtration system. It’s certified to reduce more than 70 contaminants, including 99 percent of lead – more than any other brand, according to NSF. Filtered water can be used to refill water bottles and ice cube trays, prepare infant formula, cook and make beverages like coffee, tea and even smoothies.

“Staying hydrated is especially important during the hot, summer months,” said Deb Mudway, PUR marketing vice president. “Our lead-reducing faucet filtration systems make it easy to enjoy cleaner, better-tasting water at home or on-the-go.

Take It To-Go. Keeping a bottle of water with you when you’re out and about is a convenient way to stay hydrated. Rather than disposable plastic water bottles, consider using a refillable, BPA-free bottle, which is a more environmentally friendly choice and typically more affordable.

Add a Little Flavor. Quench your thirst and add some refreshing flavor and nutrients to your water by infusing it with strawberries, kiwi, orange, mint or melon slices.

Eat Water-Rich Foods. An overlooked option for maintaining proper hydration is eating fruits and vegetables such as watermelon, cucumbers and celery that naturally contain water. For the freshest results, wash your fruits and vegetables with filtered water prior to eating them.

 

Find more ways to ensure cleaner water consumption for proper summer hydration at PUR.com.

 

June 20, 2018 |

Engage at Every Age

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(Family Features) You are never too old (or young) to take part in activities that enrich your physical, mental and emotional well-being. No matter your age, there is no better time than now to start.

 

To help do just that, consider these tips from the Administration for Community Living:

Be Well

  • If you don’t usually exercise, choose a low-impact activity that you can do a little at a time. Walk for 10 minutes in the morning, sign up for a tai chi class or learn gentle stretches, for example. Remember, it is wise to consult a health care provider before beginning an exercise routine.
  • Exercising is less of a chore when you do it with people you enjoy. Gather a group of friends or join a class. Some senior and community centers even offer free or low-cost options.
  • Good nutrition is vital. Keep an honest record of what you eat. If you have a condition like diabetes, consult your doctor before changing your diet. Nutritionists can be excellent resources, whether you have special dietary needs or not.
  • Eating healthy foods and staying active may reduce physical health risks, and you also can exercise your mind by reading, playing games, taking a class or simply being social.

Reinvent Yourself

  • Second or even third careers can be personally and financially rewarding. Determine whether you have the skills needed for something new. If not, seek out classes or training, and remember to ask whether financial assistance is available.
  • Express yourself through the arts. Learn to paint or draw, dust off those dancing shoes, take an acting class or finally write that novel. As a bonus, studies show the arts can improve brain health.
  • Keep expanding your knowledge and growing by learning a new language or taking a computer class. Or, if you’re more an adventurous type, maybe you’ve always wanted to travel and discover other cultures.

Give Back

  • Consider using your experience to serve others. Volunteers meet a range of community needs, from mentoring at-risk youth and providing job training to helping families recover from disasters. Find opportunities by visiting local organizations or charities.
  • Pick and schedule service activities that match your skills and interests. If you are handy, assisting with a nonprofit housing organization may be most rewarding. If you enjoy working with kids, contact a local school to talk about ways you can help.
  • If you want to help others more informally, consider helpful tasks like driving neighbors to appointments, babysitting for working parents or tutoring kids in your neighborhood. If you are a member of a spiritual community or club, ask if there are outreach programs that need assistance.

Increasing your well-being – physically, mentally and emotionally – can be made simpler by finding activities that fit your personality and interests. Visit oam.acl.gov to find more information and resources to engage at every age.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images (couple walking)

June 13, 2018 |

3 Keys to Becoming an Elite Athlete

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(Family Features) When it comes to becoming an elite athlete, there are differing opinions on what it takes to win gold.

Sports analysts and commentators often reference sprint times, body weight, height or age as differentiating factors, but Dr. Steven Stein, CEO of Multi-Health Systems and emotional intelligence expert, has a different idea.

Emotional intelligence is a set of emotional and social skills that influence the way people perceive and express themselves, develop and maintain social relationships, cope with challenges and use emotional information in an effective and meaningful way.

Using The Emotional Quotient Inventory 2.0 model to test emotional intelligence, Multi-Health Systems found athletes around the world often score high in self-regard: the ability to know their strengths and weaknesses; self-actualization: doing what they love and continually trying to improve; and flexibility: their ability to learn, change and take direction.

Self-Regard

Self-regard is the ability of an athlete to know his or her strengths and weaknesses. For elite athletes, it can also translate into confidence.

“Confidence, as part of self-regard, can be a key differentiator among medal winners,” Stein said. “At the highest level of many sports you have a number of athletes with near-equal skills and talent. Often, having the right mental toughness can make that millisecond or single point difference among judges.”

Self-Actualization

Self-actualization reflects comfort with who you are and what you are doing. For example, competition at the international level takes years of preparation and practice, and may require personal, social and familial sacrifices.

“Self-actualization allows an athlete to continue to learn and improve, as many athletes start out with a vision that helps define their passion,” Stein said. “For example, you frequently hear stories of athletes who come from challenging childhoods – deaths of parents, early injuries or difficulties with school – who commit fully to their sports, find success and go on to become role models for others in both athletics and overcoming adversity.”

Flexibility

Flexibility is a person’s ability to change and take direction, and for an elite athlete, it means learning from a bad performance instead of getting frustrated. It is one of the better predictors of the ability to be coached and succeed, and Multi-Health Systems found that it is especially important in both professional and amateur athletes.

“Sometimes, high-level draft picks in various sports who have difficulty taking instruction don’t make it as professional players,” Stein said. “Great athletes are often great learners, and when athletes think they already know what’s best or don’t listen to coaching, it can derail their performance.”

Learn more about emotional intelligence and the role the mental side plays in becoming an elite athlete at mhs.com.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

June 6, 2018 |

Landmark Alzheimer’s Study Urgently Seeks Volunteers

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Study focuses on early detection of Alzheimer’s disease and tracking it over time

(Family Features) Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death overall in the United States and affects more than 5 million Americans. According to experts, this number could triple to nearly 16 million people by 2050. A momentous scientific study focused on early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, and tracking it over time, seeks healthy volunteers without memory problems, as well as people who have mild memory problems and those who have been diagnosed with mild dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease.

The prestigious Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative – or ADNI – funded by the National Institutes of Health, is one of the largest and longest running Alzheimer’s disease trials in history. Now in the third phase of trials, researchers are studying how quickly things like reasoning and the ability to perform certain functions change in the aging brain. Researchers need to better understand the disease progression in order to speed the pace of discovery in the race to prevent, treat and cure Alzheimer’s disease.

“It is extremely important that more people get involved in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, which affects nearly all of us in some way,” said Michael Weiner, MD, principal investigator of the study. “We need to know how Alzheimer’s disease progresses in order to discover new treatments that could significantly improve the way we treat it in the future.”

The study uses state-of-the-art imaging to monitor brain levels of two proteins called tau and amyloid, both of which are significant indicators of Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers track cognitive function through computer tests at home and in a doctor’s office, which includes measuring changes in one’s ability to handle money, a common warning sign of the disease.

“One of the biggest challenges researchers face is finding people to volunteer to take part in studies,” said Weiner. “We can beat Alzheimer’s, but we can’t do it without volunteers. We need help.”

The ADNI Study needs 800 people to enroll in sites across the United States and in Canada. Researchers are looking for people between the ages of 55 and 90 who have normal thinking and memory function, as well as those who have mild memory problems and those who have been diagnosed with mild dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease. No medication is involved.

Potential study volunteers can learn more by visiting www.ADNI3.org or by calling 1-888-2-ADNI-95 (1-888-223-6495).

 

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

 

May 30, 2018 |
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